So I want to convert my sleeping bag into a quilt. It’s a very nicely made summer sleeping bag, I really can’t fault the construction of it. The materials are top notch and it is beautifully made. It’s just that it has no zipper, which makes it quite difficult to get in and out of, and sometimes, during the night, I’ve felt a pressing need to exit my sleeping bag in a hurry and it has led to some frustrations on my part when I’ve not been able to… In addition it really isn’t warm enough for Scandinavian summers and I don’t sleep especially warm to begin with.
So I’ve resolved, inspired by my experience of using a double quilt with my significant other, to turn my as of right now beautiful summer sleeping bag into a quilt. And in the process add some extra down that I have left over from the double quilt. It’s all a bit scary, this sleeping bag wasn’t exactly cheap and I don’t want to ruin it.

 

I’m actually quite fond of the hood on it, so I’m trying to work out if I can keep it, maybe as a clip on hood especially for the shoulder season. Especially since some years shoulder season is really all we seem to get.
Right now there is a drawstring closure all around the opening of the sleeping bag. Obviously if I remove the hood completely I will have to reroute the drawstring. What I’d actually prefer though, is if I could keep the hood attached on one side and detachable on the other. Maybe with two different attachment points, one offering a tighter fit than the other. That way I can keep the drawstring almost as it is, with the cord lock on the left side adjusting the size of the opening. I just have to cut the elastic cord on the right hand side and sow the ends in place.

As shown below the bag will then open along the red dotted line and the drawstring will continue to run along the green line.
Drawstring

While I’m adding down, which will add to the weight of the bag along with what ever buckles or snaps I choose to use. Cutting away fabric from the back of the sleeping bag will in turn lighten the bag. My guess would be, that the quilt will end up being a little lighter than it was to begin with, but not by a lot. It will be warmer though, which is the point.

Turning my summer sleeping bag into a quilt – part 2

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